Guided learning hours: 21 Unit type: Competence Unit summary Businesses and organisations use a variety of information systems to support processes needed to carry out their business functions. Each system has a particular purpose or focus that will require regular analysis and review to ensure it continues to meet the changing needs of the business and its stakeholders. This unit is about your contribution to the development and implementation of an information system that will meet identified needs in a business environment. In this unit you will learn how an organisation uses information to meet the needs of internal functional areas as well as stakeholders. You will develop skills to analyse business requirements and make constructive contributions to development solutions to meet business needs. You will be required to demonstrate your awareness of system users and the most appropri

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1.1 Explain the types of information to be managed by a system | Unit 38

Unit 38: Contribute to the Development and Implementation of an Information System

Unit reference number: A/506/1916 QCF level: 3

Credit value: 6

Guided learning hours: 21

Unit type: Competence

Unit summary

Businesses and organisations use a variety of information systems to support processes needed to carry out their business functions. Each system has a particular purpose or focus that will require regular analysis and review to ensure it continues to meet the changing needs of the business and its stakeholders. This unit is about your contribution to the development and implementation of an information system that will meet identified needs in a business environment.

In this unit you will learn how an organisation uses information to meet the needs of internal functional areas as well as stakeholders. You will develop skills to analyse business requirements and make constructive contributions to development solutions to meet business needs. You will be required to demonstrate your awareness of system users and the most appropriate information systems to meet business and information requirements. You will explore budgets, functionality and security of a range of information systems and contribute to making informed decisions based on systems analysis activities. You will be following information system development projects through to implementation and using test results to make recommendations for further systems developments.

Learning outcomes and assessment criteria

To pass this unit, the learner needs to demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the unit. The assessment criteria outline the requirements the learner is expected to meet to achieve the unit.

Unit 38: Contribute to the Development and Implementation of an Information System

Learning outcomes                                      Assessment criteria

1 Understand the design and implementation of an information system

1.1 Explain the types of information to be managed by a system

1.2 Explain how information will be used and by whom

1.3 Explain who needs to be consulted in the design and implementation of an information system and why

1.4 Explain the impact of legal and organisational security and confidentiality requirements for the design and implementation of an information system

2 Be able to contribute to the development of an information system

2.1 Confirm the purpose, use and features of an information system

2.2 Identify the information that will be managed by the system

2.3 Confirm requirements for reporting information

2.4 Recommend the functions that will be used to manipulate and report information

2.5 Develop guidance for the use of an information system that is accurate and easy to understand

2.6 Recommend user access and security levels for the information system

2.7 Make contributions to the development of an information system that are consistent with business objectives and values and within budgetary constraints

2.8 Participate in system tests in accordance with the specification

 

Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

3 Be able to contribute to the implementation of an information system

3.1 Implement the information system in accordance with the plan, minimising disruption to business

3.2 Confirm that staff are trained to use the system prior to its launch

3.3 Resolve or report problems or faults with the information system within the limits of their own authority

3.4 Adhere to organisational policies and procedures, and legal and ethical requirements in the implementation of an information system

Unit amplification

AC1.1: Explain the types of information to be managed by a system
  • Information systems: management information systems
  • Information types: marketing information, e.g. sales performance, competitor intelligence; financial information, e.g. financial costs, investment returns; human resources (HR) information, e.g. staffing, professional development; Customer Relationship Management information (CRM)
  • Information requirements: internal and external information storage; information security; accuracy; relevance; outputs e.g. payroll, invoicing, ordering, bookings, stock control, personnel records, goods tracking, decision making, marketing, customer service
  • Ways of managing information: people, e.g. users, stakeholders; process, e.g. flows, procedures, security, testing; technology, e.g. hardware, software, telecommunications; content, e.g. relevance, validity, level of detail, accuracy; risk, analysis; reporting, monitoring, reviewing
  • Information system uses: capture, transmit, store, retrieve, manipulate, display, distribution; analysis, e.g. strategic, tactical, operational
  • Functional areas of an organisation: typical areas, e.g. finance, human resources, stock control, sales, marketing, research and development, production, distribution, customer service, administration
  • Information system users: internal, e.g. system users, management, information system developers, technical support; external, e.g. customers, product suppliers, regulatory bodies
    • Stakeholders: internal, e.g. system users, management, information system developers, technical support; external, e.g. customers, product suppliers, regulatory bodies
    • Reasons for consultation: agreeing system objectives, e.g. desired system outcomes, actual system outcomes; efficiencies, e.g. cost, time, resources; information handling, e.g. input, processing, output, reporting, analysis, storage; system operations, e.g. interfaces, logical processes, usability, technical support; predicting issues, e.g. hardware, software, people, processes, data; recommendations for improvement, e.g. resolving issues, system updates, system developments
      • Design of an information system: target audience; information requirements, e.g. input, output; hardware; software, e.g. language, bespoke, ‘off the shelf’; telecommunications
    • Implementation of information system: cost; impact on procedures; impact on staff, e.g. up skilling/training, dealing with redundancies, balancing core employees with contractors and outsourced staff, enabling home and remote working, dealing with impact of regular restructuring on staff; integration of legacy systems; system ‘down time’; continuity of service; system testing
    • Legal requirements: relevant and current legislation, e.g. Data Protection Act 1998, Freedom of Information Act 2000, Computer Misuse Act 1990
    • Ethical considerations: codes of practice, e.g. use of email, internet, ‘whistle blowing’; organisational policies, information ownership
      • Operational issues: security of information, backups, e.g. hardware, peripherals, software, storage media, local storage, remote storage, cloud storage; organisational policies, procedures and processes, staff training
      • Implications of data protection: access (login, passwords), information security (internal threats, external threats, data corruption), cost, reputation, effects on business sustainability
      • Managing security (risk): cyber-crime, e.g. diverting financial assets, communications sabotage, intellectual property theft, denial of service attacks; preventive technologies, e.g. firewalls, access control methods, secure payment systems; disaster recovery procedures
AC1.2: Explain how information will be used and by whom
AC1.3: Explain who needs to be consulted in the design and implementation of an information system and why
AC1.4: Explain the impact of legal and organisational security and confidentiality requirements for the design and implementation of an information system

Information for tutors: Unit 38: Contribute to the Development and Implementation of an Information System

Suggested resources
Books

Bocij P, Greasley A and Hickie S – Business Information Systems: Technology Development and Management for the e-business, 4th Edition (FT Prentice Hall, 2008) ISBN 9780273716624

Chaffey D and White G – Business Information Management, 2nd Edition (FT/Prentice Hall, 2010) ISBN 9780273711797

Lucey Y – Management Information Systems, 9th Edition (Cengage Learning, 2005) ISBN 9781844801268

Websites

www.skillsscfa.org – the website of the Sector Skills Council, Skills CFA, which provides information and standards for business administrators

www.data-protection-act.co.uk – ‘Data Protection Act Made Easy’ website, providing guidance on the act

Assessment

This unit is internally assessed. To pass this unit the evidence that the learner presents for assessment must demonstrate that they have met the required standard specified in the learning outcomes and assessment criteria and the requirements of the Assessment Strategy.

To ensure that the assessment tasks and activities enable learners to produce valid, sufficient, authentic and appropriate evidence that meets the assessment criteria, centres should apply the Unit Assessment guidance and the requirements of the Assessment Strategy below.

Wherever possible, centres should adopt a holistic approach to assessing the units in the qualification. This gives the assessment process greater rigour and minimises repetition, time and the burden of assessment on all parties involved in the process.

Unit assessment requirements

This unit must be assessed in the workplace in accordance with the Skills CFA Assessment Strategy for Business Administration, Customer service and Management and Leadership, in Annexe A. Simulation is not allowed for this unit. All evidence of occupational competence should be generated through performance under workplace conditions; this includes evidence of achievement for knowledge- based learning outcomes and associated assessment criteria.

Unit assessment guidance

This guidance supports assessors in making decisions about how best to assess each unit and the evidence needed to meet the assessment requirements of the unit. Centres can adapt the guidance for learners and the particular assessment context, as appropriate

Assessors should ensure learners undertaking this unit, are able to demonstrate own contribution to the design and development of information systems in the scope of their role and responsibilities.

For learning outcome 1, assessors should expect more comprehensive evidence such as detailed written reflective accounts, professional discussions or embedded knowledge in competence evidence (providing command verbs have been met and evidence is sufficient) to meet the requirements of each knowledge assessment criterion.

Learners at this level could choose to present their findings and recommendations regarding information system effectiveness, design and development in a presentation. Where such presentations are a naturally occurring activity in the workplace, assessors can use direct observation to capture evidence of contributions in the form of meetings and communications with stakeholders.

Information presented could be obtained to support evidence of direct observation where information presented is not commercially sensitive.

Learning outcomes 2 and 3 will require assessment over a period of time to capture evidence of individual contributions to the design and development of information systems through to implementation of information system solutions. Assessors could capture all or parts of the design, development and implementation processes depending on the complexities of the information system being designed or developed. Full assessment from end to end of specific projects could be difficult to achieve, and therefore is not expected.

Learners should be able to present naturally occurring evidence during the completion of this unit. Evidence from work products such as project plans, technical specifications and budgets should remain in its usual location and be signposted in records of assessment. Such evidence should be supported with additional assessment methods such as discussion, reflective account or direct observation to confirm relevance and how this evidence has been used to meet the requirements of assessment criterion.

Opportunities could arise to assess the design and development of information systems projects that have already commenced. This is permitted assessment practice providing system design and development commenced within an acceptable timescale to confirm currency. Validated discussions could be used to assess historical competences demonstrated by the learner where system design and development is still taking place.

Learners working at this level, designing and developing information systems can present detailed reflective accounts relating to competence demonstrated throughout a project. This evidence should be supported with clear timelines, project tasks, contributions, responsibilities and outcomes. Alternatively, project plans, implementation schedules, technical specifications and evidence of system monitoring, testing and review could be considered for assessment with effective use made of supportive or supplementary assessments to confirm relevance and competences demonstrated.

Assessors can access testimonies and statements from witnesses in the workplace who can confirm contributions of the learner to specific information systems projects.

Evidence of Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) can be used in the unit to confirm competence. Wherever possible, the learning outcomes in this unit should be assessed holistically across the qualification.

Reference no: EM132069492

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