The U.S. Constitution and the Federalist v. Antifederalist Papers “But what is government itself, but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary.” – James Madison On September 17, 1787, 39 of the 55 delegates from 12 of the 13 states signed the newly crafted U.S. Constitution in Independence Hall, Philadelphia, PA. (OConnor & Sabato, 2019) The new U.S. Constitution was approved by the United States’ current government, the Congress of the Confederation, and a resolution was sent to all 13 states that sought ratification of the Constitution: Article VII: “The Ratification of the Conventions of nine

The U.S. Constitution and the Federalist v. Antifederalist Papers

But what is government itself, but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary.” – James Madison

On September 17, 1787, 39 of the 55 delegates from 12 of the 13 states signed the newly crafted U.S. Constitution in Independence Hall, Philadelphia, PA. (OConnor & Sabato, 2019) The new U.S. Constitution was approved by the United States’ current government, the Congress of the Confederation, and a resolution was sent to all 13 states that sought ratification of the Constitution: Article VII: “The Ratification of the Conventions of nine States, shall be sufficient for the Establishment of this Constitution between the States so ratifying the Same.” (U.S. Constitution, Article VII)

Now, it was up to the individual states to either ratify or not ratify the new Constitution.

As each of the thirteen colonial legislatures sought to ratify the U.S. Constitution, newspapers published the U.S. Constitution so that “we the people” could understand and debate the new, governmental document. During the fall of 1787 and into the summer of 1788, newspapers published hundreds of letters to the editor penned by individual citizens that argued for and against ratification.

Additionally, the debate over ratification saw the emergence of two, opposed political parties composed of this nation’s founding fathers: the Federalists and Antifederalists. The Federalists advocated for the adoption of the new Constitution, and the Anti-Federalists opposed it. Members from both parties produced newspaper articles that explained their ideological rationale for or against ratification.

More information regarding the Federalist v Anti-Federalist debate can be found in the National Constitution Center and the U.S. Archives.

In this assignment, you will examine and explain how the Federalist and Anti-Federalist plans shaped the U.S. Constitution.

Directions: Within a 500 word, APA formatted expository essay, please include:

  • A title page
  • An introduction
  • How do Federalists and Anti-Federalists plan to organize the federal government?
    • Executive Branch
      • How does the U.S. Constitution reflect the Federalist plan?
    • Legislative Branch
      • How does the U.S. Constitution reflect the Federalist plan?
    • Judicial Branch
      • How does the U.S. Constitution reflect the Federalist plan?
  • How did the Federalists and Anti-Federalists understand the relationship between the federal government and the states?
    • How does the U.S. Constitution reflect the Federalist plan?
  • How did the Federalists and Anti-Federalists articulate their arguments within local newspapers’ letter to the editor that argued for and against ratification?
  • Based on your academic understanding of federalism which party would you align yourself with? Why?
  • Support your analysis with information obtained from the text, the U.S. Constitution, and at least two Federalist and/or Anti-Federalist essays.
  • A conclusion
  • A reference page

Your paper should also meet the following requirements:

  • APA format.
    • Title page.
    • Reference page.
    • APA citations.
    • Double spaced sentences.
    • 12-point Times New Roman font.
  • Standard English grammar conventions.
    • Correct grammar.
    • Correct punctuation and spelling.
    • Logical, well ordered sentences.

Note that your expository essay should have a clearly established and sustained viewpoint and purpose. In addition, your writing should be well ordered, logical and unified, as well as original and insightful.

The Assignment should be at least 500 words, and must use and cite the text and primary documents as sources. Cite the work internally and in full reference at the end, following APA style guidelines. Citation is important to build the definitions, demonstrate your research, and to make it clear which ideas are yours and which are from the source. Check with the Writing Center for APA style tips and assistance.

Submitting Your Assignment:
When you are ready, submit your assignment to the Dropbox.

Your assignment will automatically be submitted to TurnItIn to Avoid Plagiarism.

TurnItIn (TII) is a service that helps Purdue Global students improve their writing on assignments by checking for plagiarism, originality, and similarity. TII is integrated with all dropboxes in Purdue Global courses allowing students to access and review a similarity report after submitting the assignment to a dropbox.

Assignments submitted to a TII enabled dropbox will be automatically analyzed by TurnItIn. Soon after you submit your assignment, you will be able to view the TurnItIn Originality Report. An icon will appear in the report column of the Assessment Inbox once the Originality Report is available.

The report compares your assignment to a database of student submissions and websites and provides a summary of what parts of your assignment have matching or highly similar text. In addition to providing an originality score, the report contains feedback on grammar and English language usage.

For more information:

References:

Constitution Society: Everything needed to decide constitutional issues. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.constitution.org/.

The Constitution of the United States. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/constitution.

Constitution of the United States-A History. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/more-perfect-union.

National Constitution Center. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://constitutioncenter.org/.
O’Connor, K., & Sabato, L. (2018). American government: Roots and reform. Columbus: Pearson.

Reference no: EM132069492

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