Think about Hall’s conceptualization of diaspora and Gopinath’s advocay for using a “queer diasporic framework,” explain your own understanding of diaspora with your own words, and use it to articulate what are the “diasporas” or diasporic cultures you belong to or not belong to? And what are the ways in which the insight(s) you learned from Abu-Lughod helps you with your understanding of your “diasporas?”

Think about Hall’s conceptualization of diaspora and Gopinath’s advocay for using a “queer diasporic framework,” explain your own understanding of diaspora with your own words, and use it to articulate what are the “diasporas” or diasporic cultures you belong to or not belong to? And what are the ways in which the insight(s) you learned from Abu-Lughod helps you with your understanding of your “diasporas?”

A diaspora in layman’s language can be translated as “a home away from home”. This means that people who are in the diasporas can say they belong to that particular country, whether they are there temporarily or otherwise. An important fact to note however, is that most people in diaspora still have allegiance to their mother countries. Such loyalty to one’s origins is inevitable, given that the mother countries carry personal memories and experiences that the individuals will permanently relate to. As such, the attribute of allegiance ought not be used to be used as a basis to alienate. As borders continue to open up globally, and countries experience higher levels of immigration, it is unjust if the host society fails to grant them freedom to be themselves and to practice their cultures without prejudice.

That given, one example of a diasporic culture that I am aware of – but do not necessarily   belong to –comprises of groups from the Middle East, settled in America. Such groups are reserved when it comes to diet and dressing, and also practice polygamy as opposed to the typical nuclear family arrangements upheld in the typical American culture. Against this background, for one to understand the importance of creating a world that is free of judgment for aliens, it is important that they put themselves in the alien’s shoes.  A world where one cannot eat their favorite food, practice their religion, or dress in a manner they like can be a horrific one to dwell in. This serves as a reflection of the world that people in diaspora have to put up with, as they receive criticism and discrimination based on nationalist assumptions of other cultures.

In this light, the queer diasporic framework challenges the viability of single, pure, absolutist cultures in diaspora contexts, while restating the idea that such cultures can be observed alongside other alien cultures that may otherwise be regarded as inappropriate or unimaginable.

APA

 

 

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The post Think about Hall’s conceptualization of diaspora and Gopinath’s advocay for using a “queer diasporic framework,” explain your own understanding of diaspora with your own words, and use it to articulate what are the “diasporas” or diasporic cultures you belong to or not belong to? And what are the ways in which the insight(s) you learned from Abu-Lughod helps you with your understanding of your “diasporas?” appeared first on Apax Researchers.

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